Master Procrastinator

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Random Thoughts, II

Posted by Andrew Zercie on August 9, 2009

Some thoughts of mine that, by themselves, aren’t worth an entire article, but are worth commenting on…

Classic Brett...before he sullied his legacy.

Classic Brett...before he sullied his legacy.

Brett Favre: He had a great career with the Green Bay Packers and should have retired following the Packers’ loss to the New Jersey Giants in the 2007-08 NFC Championship Game.

His single year with the New Jersey Jets produced exactly zero memorable moments, and the “will-he-or-won’t-he” dance about whether or not he would suit up in each of the last two years was tiresome.

Sadly, I don’t think this is the end of Brett Favre. After all, Michael Jordan retired three times. Compared to MJ, Brett’s got one more “un-retirement” left.

Michael Vick: I would like to think that teams are not blacklisting Vick, as Jesse Jackson claims. He’s been out of the NFL for two years and, when he was in the league, he wasn’t the best QB by any statistical measure.

If an average starting QB retired and then decided to come back after a two-year layoff, during which he didn’t play football or stayed in football shape, he probably wouldn’t be immediately signed by a team. He’d be forced to convince a team through an open tryout or something similar.

Vick will play professional football again. Just because he hasn’t signed immediately, and because many teams have said they aren’t currently interested in him, doesn’t mean the guy is being discriminated against because of the nature of his crime or his race. I think he has to prove himself, on and off the field, before someone commits to him.

Seems fair to me, given his two years away from the game. 

 

 

 

The face of PED use in the NBA, but no one knows it.

The face of PED use in the NBA, but no one knows it.

The PED Double Standard:

 

 

 Quietly, Orlando Magic forward Rashard Lewis was suspended for the first 10 games of the 2009-10 season for having an ‘elevated testosterone level’ on a recent drug test earlier this week.

Of course, the news was overshadowed by the story in the New York Times that David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez were on the now-famous list of 104 players who tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs in 2003.

If Lewis were a baseball player, he’d be villified and eviscerated in the national media, much in the same way that Ramirez, Ortiz, and several others were before them. Lewis has essentially gotten a free pass for being the first ‘name’ player (five others have failed PED tests in the NBA) to receive a suspension from the NBA for failing a test for performance enhancement.

MLB has come a long way in regards to policing performance enhancing drugs in their game. Theirs is the toughest testing program in American professional sports, but one wouldn’t think that is the case given all the negative press that the game and the players receive every time a new positive test comes out.

By comparison, the NBA is naive about the use of performance enhancers in their its sport. Many would say that the game of basketball isn’t suited to husky, muscular players. To that I point to Dwight Howard, who has cultivated a wholesome image and is built like a 6’10” defensive end. I’m not saying Howard is using steroids, but I am saying he is a big, muscular guy.

At least MLB and the NBA aren’t as bad as the NFL. Yes, the NFL has a great testing program and has ensured that players are using NFL-approved supplements to build muscle mass. But, by approving certain performance-enhancing supplements, the NFL is tacitly accepting that their sport requires more than a ‘passion for the game.’

However, when a player does test positive in the NFL, using something outside the scope of the league’s approved list, like Shawne Merriman or Rodney Harrison have in recent years, the reaction is a standard four-game suspension (one-fourth of the season, not too shabby) and minimal negative press coverage.

It’s a sad double standard that MLB has yet to overcome.

Sonia Sotomayor: President Obama’s first appoinment for the Superme Court was sworn in over the weekend, making her the second female currently on the Supreme Court, and the first Hispanic justice.

It is said that Sotomayor’s presence will not alter the Court’s ideological balance. However, her appointment to the high court is again proof that America is still a place where one can dream big and aim high, no matter where one starts off in life.

Vampires Everywhere: I’m thinking of getting some fangs and brooding. My goodness.

I like “True Blood.” It’s a pretty good show. Best thing on TV? No, but it’s interesting.

The rest of the Vampire culture that has taken over…I’m done with it.

That said…bring on the zombies! Go read “The Road.” Maybe give “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” a try. Watch “28 Weeks Later.” Go see “Zombieland” when it hits theaters. Let’s give some other fictional undead some space in our consciousness and give the vampires a rest.

Twitter: I just started a Twitter account last week, which now means that Twitter is no longer cool. Beware the day I get an iPod. I’m still using CDs.

Back to the Twitter thing…I’m going to post links from here to there. I am still trying to figure it all out. Anyway, here’s a link to my profile page: http://twitter.com/AndrewZercie . Feel free to tweet me.

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One Response to “Random Thoughts, II”

  1. Baseballbriefs.com tracking back Random Thoughts, II…

    Baseballbriefs.com tracking back Random Thoughts, II…

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